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Université Paul Sabatier Toulouse III CNRS

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CRCA - UMR 5169 - CNRS
Université Paul Sabatier
Bâtiment IVR3
118 route de Narbonne
F-31062 Toulouse cedex 09

Tél : 05 61 55 67 31
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Home > Research teams > Revealing Memory Mechanisms of the Brain (REMEMBeR)

Objectives

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Group leader: Claire RAMPON

Research projects carried out in the team will address the fundamental question of how enduring memories are formed in the brain, therefore placing our goals and strategy at the core of the CRCA’s main focus on phenotypic and experience-dependent plasticity.
We are studying more specifically mechanisms of cerebral plasticity related to spatial and episodic memory in normal mice and in mouse models of memory dysfunctions or pathologies. We will focus on learning-induced plasticity processes at different levels from the activity of neuronal networks (cerebral oscillations, synaptic plasticity, inhibitory networks), to cells (neurogenesis, morphology of neurons or glial cells, interactions between neurons and glia), neurobiological issues (protein or gene expression, release of neurotransmitters, role of mitochondria) to finally work at the molecular level (epigenetic regulations, role of transcriptional factors).

These mechanisms are also studied in the context of normal and pathological aging (mostly Alzheimer’s disease) and also in mouse models of mood disorders (mostly post traumatic stress disorders).

We used multiple and complementary approaches: behavioral analysis, electrophysiology in behaving animals, EEG, pharmacology, intracerebral microdialysis, confocal imaging, molecular and cellular biology.


Key words: memory; aging, emotion ; longevity; stress; behavior; neuronal plasticity ; memory consolidation and reconsolidation, hippocampus, prefrontal cortex; glial cells; long term potentiation (LTP); cognitive reserve; epigenetics, proteasome ; adult neurogenesis; neuropetides; Alzheimer’s disease ; post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD); anxiety.